Cascade Singletrack

 

Home of world class singletrack, the Cascade range extends from Lytton Mountain in British Columbia to Lassen Peak in Northern California. CascadeSingletrack is a documentary project and map guide, covering the Cascade Range National Forests and focused on cross-country singletrack trails for mountainbiking, hiking and XC Skiing.

Status of ride pages

Please see the Cascade TrailFinder or the National Forest TrailFinders for individual ride page status.

Page development is based on Overall Ranking and ride popularity, though updates tend to be focused on trail clusters.

Site updates are noted on the CascadeSingletrack Facebook page.

New rides and XC Ski trails are (slowly) being added, as are wilderness area hiking trails.

Portions of the Pacific Range and select National Forests in Eastern Washington, Oregon and Utah will be added over time.

Topo To-Go!

Android and iOS icon

The site is built to work with all popular phones and tablets, reducing screen width to a 'single track' as needed. Some graphics, such as large topo maps, remain full size for better viewing.

Windows 8 Start Menu

Win8 users can pin the site and individual trail pages to the Start Menu. Get the best tile image by opening IE from the Start menu, go to the site, then pin to Start.

Doublewide: Stretch the browser across dual monitors or go full screen on a retina display...

Weather Popup: shows the NOAA 7-day forecast in a popup window. (modern browser req'd)

CascadeSingletrack has created an evaluation matrices to identify 'destination' rides (those considered to be rides worthy of a day or overnight trip). The ranking page describes the evaluation process, which has been consistently applied to all of the listed trails so that every ride can be compared to all of the other rides.

Site development currently consists of basic ride information, such as maps and other kinds of data about a ride (stats, directions, topo, elevation profile and some basic guide information). More immersive ride content will follow, with enhanced ride description, photos and videos.

Share the Trail

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Facebook Recommend and Send buttons allow you to share ride information with friends.

Share Comments with Friends, or with everyone, at the bottom of each page. Please see the Terms of Use page for public posting guidelines.

Check out the Cascade Singletrack YouTube Channel for our latest videos.

Site navigation and the TrailFinder can help identify the best trails for a particular riding style and driving distance, to see the rides you want alongside other rides that meet the same criteria.

The site currently contains 215 destinations, covering about 1000 rides (composed of thousands of trails).

Check out the Printable Area Topo Map links for each ride, offering an expanded area view, featuring a high-resolution topo map. Use waterproof printer paper to print your own topo maps.

The trail pages include forest service links, which are a useful source of trail closure and maintenance info. When exploring new areas, be sure to locate the ranger station nearest the trail, and call or stop by to talk to them about trail conditions, camping and other information.

 

See the full-page Cascade Range Trails map, which shows all of the trailhead locations.

Interactive map: Select a National Forest area. Use the TrailFinder to search by trail name or some other attribute. Please refresh your browser if map fails to load.

 

 

 

Advocacy and MTB alliances

The links page includes a number of advocate groups, a great source of trail information, current conditions, trail maintenance opportunities and other group events.

The Washington-based Evergreen MTB Alliance wiki is an excellent source of information about (reasonably) current conditions, advocacy, history and everything else you might want to know. The NW Trail Alliance Wiki covers portions of Oregon.

Please contribute to their efforts (updating wiki pages, trail crews, web maintenance, money...).

 

 

What you will find here: Destination Rides

Great rides are created from the right trails. Most of the rides listed are loops, with each ride consisting of several trails and in some cases fireroad climbs.

The best rides are created from the right combination of climbing and downhill terrain.

At the extreme, a rails-to-trails loop is no more fun than a 8mi hike-a-bike just to get to the downhill.

Destination rides involve 3-8hrs of driving (from metro areas), so listings need to meet the following criteria:

  • More than 60% singletrack ride time, and not shared with ORV.
  • At least a two hour ride, over cross-country mtn biking terrain.
  • Reasonably accessible and maintained. Caveats noted if it takes the local riders hours to get to the trailhead or if the Forest Service prefers to let the trail go 'au naturale'.
  • An above average ranking.

Exceptional rides which don't meet these criteria may still be listed, but marked as non-destination.

Not so much: Current conditions, Tree farms, State parks ...There are plenty of websites which cover state park and local trail systems, some of which are listed on our links page.

 

 

Mountainbiking + Backcountry = Risk.

Warning: Mountain biking is inherently dangerous, even more so when riding on terrain which is beyond your skill level. Please don't interpret the ride rankings as a personal challenge.

People get killed or seriously injured on these trails every year, so consider the terrain and remoteness of any trail and take reasonable precautions.

Ride with other people when possible. The Links page includes various mountain bike associations, many of whom offer group rides, skills classes and advice on biking safety.

 

 

Jenson Discount MTB

Weather: Local weather links are provided but do not indicate if the trail is washed out, snow covered, etc..

The riding season for a trail above 3000' is likely to be June - October. Above 4000' the season is likely limited to July-September.

Riding in the Spring or late Fall is usually limited to drier areas like Bend or trails that have southern exposure.

These trails also tend to dry out within a few days of rainfall.

 

Corrigenda Omnium: This site is actively developed. Please refresh your browser if map images are missing, as maps are being optimized and so older images may no longer exist.

The climbing difficulty as stated in text is always a little more up to date than the navigational maps, although the map trailhead locations are pretty darn accurate.

Expect to see some trail ranking and stats changes as the topo maps are being generated.

Site Tech Requirements. Low bandwidth users can improve site performance by adjusting their Tools/Internet Options/Browsing History to increase the temp file disk space, and by changing the page refresh setting to not refresh the data on each page load.